Padre Matteo Ricci
 

Matteo Ricci and his Land

 

  Although  he  left  his  native  land  and  never  returned,  he  did  not  forget  it.  On  the  contrary,  distance  and  separation  strengthened  his  attachment. 


   When  he  created  his  large  map  of  the  entire  world  in  Chinese,  he  wrote  only  the  name  of  his  region  on  the  Adriatic  coast,  as  well  as  otherwise  naming  only  the  regions  of  Lombardy,  Piedmont,  Calabria,  and  Apulia  and  the  cities  of  Rome,  Genoa,  Venice,  and  Naples.  Ricci  made  sure  that  he  introduced  the  Chinese  to  the  name  of  his  native  land  on  his  map.

 

   A  singular  and  curious  bond  with  his  native  land  can  be  seen  in  his  language  itself,  when  -  particularly  in  the  last  years  of  his  life  -  Ricci  used  words  and  expressions  typical  of  the  dialect  spoken  in  Macerata.  Almost  immediately,  as  early  was  when  he  was  in  India,  he  complained  that  he  no  longer  had  a  good  command  of  the  Italian  language,  because  he  was  speaking  at  first  Portuguese  and  Spanish  every  day  and  then  also,  and  especially,  Chinese.  As  the  years  went  by,  expressions  and  terms  of  the  Macerata  dialect  -  the  language  he  learned  at  home  even  before  Italian  -  appear  more  and  more  often  in  Ricci's  writing.  Words  such  as  amontonate  (for  ammucchiate,  "heaped"),  soreci  (for  sorci,  "mice"),  ammollirà  (for  renderà  più  tenero,  "will  make  more  tender"  -  507),  veggie  (for  guardie,  "sentries"  -  515),  and  dicete  (for  dite,  "say"),  etc.  are  sufficient  evidence  of  this.

 

   There  is  a  final  bond  with  his  native  land,  consisting  of  several  features  of  Ricci's  character  and  his  overall  personality  that  are  typical  of  people  from  the  Marche,  and  in  particular  from  Macerata.  Those  who  knew  him  describe  Ricci  as  a  self‐effacing,  reserved,  and  silent  person  ("has  a  long  beard  and  is  of  few  words "  or  "taciturn"),  extremely  industrious,  and  with  the  physical  and  mental  endurance  typical  of  the  sturdy  peasants  of  the  Marche.  However,  he  was,  at  the  same  time,  shrewd  and  judicious,  as  well  as  endowed  with  a  subtle  streak  of  irony  and  self‐mockery.  Without  exaggerating  or  straining  the  truth,  in  terms  of  character,  we  can  consider  Ricci  a  typical  representative  of  the  people  of  the  Marche,  and  particular  of  the  sturdy  and  judicious  countryside  of  Macerata.


from the document "Le Marche di Matteo Ricci", Filippo Mignini

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Copyright © 2009 Comitato Celebrazioni Padre Matteo Ricci

Sito realizzato con CMS per siti accessibili e-ntRA - RA Computer Spa